JOURNAL

Q+A: RENÉ SHOEMAKER + HOPE HILTON DISCUSS FRANCE, BEING AN ARTIST, INSPIRATION, CHANGE, THE dÉRIVE, COMMUNITY, THE SITUATIONISTS, + MORE

 
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I've been wanting to ask these questions of René for some time, and I was so very happy when our schedules allowed the time to make this happen. A little background: I knew René's work years before I knew René personally, and I quietly watched her work grow and evolve from the sidelines. As an artist and curator, a big part of what I do is pay attention to how creatives and thinkers are responding to the world. Watching the work happen is a beautiful thing to behold, and I draw from this collection when I put exhibitions together or pair artists up to collaborate. It's like being a composer, a poet, and a philosopher all at once! When I finally met René we were fast friends, and I always have her work in mind when I'm in the world and thinking about what the world needs - more slowing down, more curiosity, more dream following, more wandering, and more, well, hope. René offers this. Enjoy our Q+A! xoHope

Hope Hilton: I've always wondered - at what point did you know you were an artist?

René Shoemaker: At a very young age I was always creating and seeking inspiration. One of my earliest creations - way before I was 5 years old - was a horse that I pieced together from the cloth of my Mom’s sewing discards. I cut out the pieces and sewed them onto another piece of cloth (some might call that ‘applique’).

 

HH: When did you decide to pursue your art full time?

RS: Oh, man, this has been inside of me for a long, long time. I had a “master plan” to retire from The University of Georgia absolutely the MOMENT that I could - not because I didn't like my job as Library Director/ Librarian / Gallery Director (I did like it, tremendously) - but so I could practice my art full time. I had been making art all along, always, but became more serious about it in 1998 when I returned from a summer working in Cortona, Italy. I was in a job there surrounded by artists and art-making people (not to mention the gorgeous Italian hillside architecture and use of the land!) and was completely inspired. Once I began making art more intently, I also discovered how time-consuming the business of art is. Retirement allowed me this time.

HH: Ahhh, retirement... you are doing it right, in my opinion. Now that you have this freedom, you can go anywhere, do anything. I love that you've settled in France and cannot wait to visit! How has being an artist there differed from being an artist in the States? What is something that's easier to get accomplished in the States and vice versa?

RS: I have the feeling that the French have a different attitude toward artists here. It’s not different as much as it is in the States. Here it's just another job description, a part of life! I also discovered that being an artist, and having an exhibition scheduled and about to open so soon after my arrival, was a wonderful introduction to my new community. Who I was and what Harvey and I were doing there was open to the public. In our new place we seemed to be integrated into the community a lot quicker than if it were otherwise.

It’s easier to work here in France because there are less distractions. At home I have a schedule, I have friends, I have social obligations. Here, I have my studio, I have my house, I have Harvey, and the landscape that calls to me every day. Everything, everyday, is an inspiration.

HANDS DOWN it’s easier to find the art supplies I need in Athens, Georgia. I will never, ever, ever again take for granted the fabulous service that The Loft and KA Artist Shop offer to the artists and creatives of the region. I would not be where I am today without the support - and the supplies - from KA and The Loft.

Feeling spaces became something I noticed then,

and it has continued.

- René Shoemaker

 

HH: I think I take internet-ordering for granted, too, in terms of art supplies. And, yes, we have this amazing community here in Athens that supports artists through all levels of their work. I wanna talk about your new work, the work I respond to the most. Much of your new work is an investigation and commitment to a specific community, and because architecture has been a big part of your work (and life!) in the past, did this just happen naturally, or did you know that you wanted to encounter a whole city?

RS: I know I want to conquer the world, and what better way to do it than city by city? I’m not sure where my connection to place comes from... Well, now that I write that, I can imagine that it comes from exploring and the sense of place I created by living in the woods in a handmade house. Traveling in France, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands gave me a sense that there are other ways of doing things, often the everyday things that we take for granted. (i.e.: architecture and living spaces and the differences abroad versus home). Christopher Alexander’s book “A Pattern Language” had a big impact on me and my viewpoint.

I also moved at age 17 from everything I knew (not so early in life, but a transformative experience for me) and this provoked new sensations, a kind of "feeling" of spaces. I was searching for the meaning of life then, and also tuning in to the details - loving the sound of the tires on the pavement as I traveled down the road - usually in a friend’s car or by hitchhiking. Later on, in my own car (an International Harvester pickup truck!), it was me and my Great Dane, Eric, having marvelous explorations. Feeling spaces became something I noticed then, and it has continued.

After having wandered for over 10 years, and landing in Athens... You know, it's a very small town - only 10 square blocks in the downtown area - but it feels good. The spaces are intriguing, the juxtaposition of new and old architecture inspirational. I love looking at the old Otasco building (now the Holmes-Hunter) as I cross Broad Street to North Campus at the University. Harvey and I had a small business downtown and I spent 30+ years on North Campus, so downtown Athens was like a home... I had an art studio there, and I felt very happy to be there.

 

HH: And now MY studio is on the exact floor where yours was, years later! I loved the day you told me about that. I looked at the space differently, I envisioned it as when you inhabited it. Not a lot has changed but someone put carpet in the halls and painted the stairs... it's a different space now. But the same place. What prompted you to explore places to begin with and how has this idea changed for you?

RS: For my first solo exhibition at Clayton Street Gallery in Athens in 2001, I offered two proposals - one of exploring the town of Athens and one an exploration of my house (handbuilt, octagon-shaped, in the woods). The Director chose the house proposal and we named it “Ethereal Spaces.” We also decided to pursue the other proposal the following year, and “From Here to There” was born from my explorations of Downtown Athens and the University of Georgia. Then and there, my career was born.

Also, I don't want to forget that when I first moved to the Florida Keys in 1969, way before University, I took a drawing class from a local artist. He took us around to the various locations in the Keys, and what I remember the most - what had the biggest impression on me -  were the old weather-beaten structures on Pigeon Key. There I discovered the beauty of lines that are not straight. I learned how to draw perspective from that artist, and I also learned how to veer away from true perspective with confidence.

 

HH: I love that, when teachers share with you all of the levels of things, and everything involved, and how to just approach it with enough lack of fear to evolve it into a confident mark or gesture. How cool that you were exploring the Keys as part of a class! Now that explorations of place are revered in the art world, especially in prominent museums and galleries, your work is part of a large canon of artists that focus on community, history, and exploring.  One of my favorite movements in art history were the Situationists (in France in the mid 20th century!), and one of their best projects, in my opinion, was setting the intention to wander. They called it a dérive: to wander without knowing why or where you'll end up. How do you feel about connecting to this great idea of the past to now?

RS: I‘m happy to hear that explorations of place are now revered in the art world -- can we schedule a show of my work at a major New York City museum now? :) I love your connection of my sense of exploration to the Situationists’ quest for an “unplanned journey”. There are so many things that point to the fact that I must have lived in France in a former life, as in my name: Re =again né = born... there is no French blood in my family to invite a French name be given to me, yet here I am. Wandering... being alive...

To wander! This is the perfect way to exist. No maps, no guidebooks, only discoveries.

And the past? The Situationists were not so long ago. The past is connected to the present. Always.

A wonderful consequence of the work that I do - exploring a place through its spaces - are the stories I receive in return. This was an unexpected result of putting my art out into the world. My visual stories encourage others to explore, and see, and remember, their own discoveries of a place.

 

HH: In my opinion, the stories and connections are the best thing to come out of creating and sharing art. Why do you think we are craving work like this again, work that connects us? 

RS: Are we? In this life of disconnectedness (especially in the States), I believe there is a strong urge to connect. Families are changing. Nondescript strip malls have taken over America. The concept of “belonging” constantly changes. People wander. Others ask questions. I, myself, was disconnected and rootless for over 10 years, from my late teens to late 20’s. I haven’t consciously made that connection before (of my work related to place and my disconnectedness in the past), but maybe this question will lead to the answer for me?

I believe in the beauty and simplicity of line and color. This quiet beauty is what I am trying to share with the world.

HH: And sharing that with the world helps us rest, connect, recognize, wonder... And I want to understand, because you headed to France at such a tumultuous time politically (newly elected president here and there, immigration politics and terrorism, etc.), what are the conversations like about the States there, if there are any? How do you see us represented or generalized across the pond?

RS: I’m living in a very rural area, and am not completely fluent in the language, so I’m not sure I can say much about the mood of this country towards America. These days I don’t read the news, nor do I watch TV... Although people do shake their head in disbelief if the name of our current president comes up. Otherwise, I find that the USA is still well respected, and that there is still a memory that the United States helped France immensely in WWII. 

 

HH: That's really good to hear in so many ways, as I've received emails from friends across the globe offering help and support. I like focusing on the local, on my small town and my amazingly diverse state, and doing my best. I also haven't been the best at keeping up with the news. Perhaps this is showing up in our art? I have noticed changes in your work since you were in France! Being in new spaces often brings along a shift that's usually quite strong, and often quite brave. So you're in this new place, and it's yours so you can settle in, and just... do your work. It sounds like a dream! I've watched your work shift in the exploration in and around other new spaces - from working in pencil and pastel at your Penland Residency to working HUGE at the Columbus Museum… and I'm not the only one who is noticing! This question is from your dear reader Maureen:

Maureen: My question is about the use of threads sewn onto your work. What inspired you to add that touch?

RS: Moving to France gave me the freedom to release myself from any boxes I had placed myself in, even before the move actually happened. There was something about the fact - in my head - that the people here were not familiar with my work, and that I could be free to try any method, medium, idea - there were no expectations of who I was and what my work had been in the past. The only person who had any idea of my previous work was M Wilfried Celerien, the Adjoint au Mairie of Felletin, whom I had made the original proposal for my current exhibition to - and I am happy to say he was delighted to see my new direction(s).

Thank you, Maureen, for always asking such thoughtful questions! I have been considering adding stitching to my silk paintings for quite a while but was unsure of how I would approach it, and how I could make it “different” from other artists’ work. My framed silks always have an element of stitching, as I hand stitch the silk to the mat board - but often these stitches become invisible to the eye.

When I arrived in France and was faced with a deadline to create and complete a body of art for an exhibition in a short period of time, my resources were (very) limited and I was free to experiment with new materials. I located embroidery threads with the right colors at the local recycle store. There are two layered silk paintings in the Felletin exhibit, and as I didn’t have an embroidery hoop, I had no way of keeping the fabric taut while I worked on it. I stitched through the mat board to add texture to the flowers in one design, and to highlight the wooden shutters and metal door slats on the other. It seems crazy, because it was only a few stitches, but I really could go on for hours discussing the reasons behind my actions!

And as a side note - I have always had an element of working large with my art. From my senior BFA exhibit when I had weavings, embroideries, and monoprints at a 6’x6’ size, to motion drawings I created at Penland that were 4’ x 6’, to a silk painting installation at the Ramsey Center at UGA that was 4’ x 12’ (x3). I feel comfortable working large, so working small here was also a new experiment.

The Short answer? 

I wanted to add texture and color to a simple design in a subdued way.

 

HH: So, are you afraid of anything?

RS: Rien. If I am afraid of something, I try hard to identify in and overcome it. Consciously.

 

HH: Any advice for young artists?

RS: Work hard. Never give up. Look inside and don’t forget who you are. Trust your instincts.

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HH: And what's next for you?

RS: Taking over the world. Exploring new media and pushing the boundaries of the work that I do. A museum exhibition in Mississippi in 2019. An art show in Bordeaux, France in 2017. I am always searching for opportunities, and I look forward to exhibiting again in Athens!

 

HH: What is your life’s force?

RS: 1. Perseverance furthers.   2. A sense of constant amazement at what I experience, and the fact that I am constantly amazed by the NEGATIVE SPACE shape of the sky against a building’s roofline.

HH: Any questions for us?

RS: I love feedback and stories. I’d love people to respond to this interview by writing about their experiences with my art. This helps me more than they can ever know.

 

HH: It really is such a huge part of it all, that conversation and that community. Thank you so much for sharing with us. Dear readers, please feel invited to share below any stories or inspirations. Let René and I know where you wander, or what currently inspires you.

 

 

RS: Thank you, Hope Hilton!

 

- René Shoemaker

July 17, 2017

La Creuse, France

 

 

 

Art After the 2016 Election

Full disclosure: I voted for Hillary Clinton. I believed, from the bottom of my heart, that she was the best person for the job, and that what she genuinely wanted to do was take care of us—all of us.

The day after the election, I couldn’t imagine that the world would continue to turn, and that our normal everyday lives would go on.

But they have. And I think now that what I need to do is to help bring peace and positive energy into this world. I believe the way I can do that best is to continue making artwork that brings more light and beauty into our shared environment. So that is what I will do.

And on that note, I’m happy to announce that just in time for the holidays, a new collection of my hand-dyed, colorful silk scarves are now available at Aurum Studios in downtown Athens!

 

 

& HOT OFF THE PRESSES!

A new t-shirt is available at the Jittery Joe’s in 5 Points. This design depicts my favorite cup on my favorite table at my favorite Athens coffee shop. Stop in and get one for everyone on your list or order online HERE.

I am excited to be participating for the first time this year in the Handmade Hollyday Artist Market on Dec. 11th, hosted by Athens’ Treehouse Kid & Craft Store at the Starlite Showroom (750 W. Broad Street in Athens). I’ll be there with lots of René Shoemaker goodies: original silk art and linoleum prints, fine art reproductions of my most popular work, photographs, silk scarves, and t-shirts. 
 

Finally, if you want to bring color, beauty, and light into the world with your own hands while creating a special work of art for yourself or someone you love, I invite you to join me at my next silk-painting class on Saturday, Dec. 10th at the KA Artist Shop, 127 N. Jackson Street in Athens. I am offering two classes that day; come to one or join us for both to create two silk scarves or paintings! To register or for more information, visit https://kaartist.com/products/silk-painting-with-rene-shoemaker

 

With much love,

 

-René

 

The Sweetness of the Magnolia Bloom

What was your first experience with a magnolia blossom? I bet you remember it as well as I remember my first encounter:

The first time I saw a magnolia blooming I thought I must be in heaven. That amazing size along with the pure white hue, the density of the petals, and its amazing beauty made it seem immortal ... although I could see that it appeared to fade as all flowers do. This first encounter was on a wooden stair landing in an historic 1850’s house in North Georgia. The magnolia bloom was floating in a bowl of water. It was a magical evening filled with candlelight and the deep odor of magnolias and honeysuckle.

I created this new painting, titled “The Sweetness of the Magnolia Bloom”, to send to New Orleans for The Cultural Landscape Foundation auction this year, and the above text is what I wrote as my artist statement. I am delighted with this new painting and feel like it is moving my art in a new direction with its simplicity and linear quality.

As part of the process, I created a second magnolia blossom painting; see it here:

Both of the magnolia paintings are hand-painted with dye on silk broadcloth, a lovely, soft, dense, matte silk. Last year, the painting I donated, “Kennedy Road Beaver Pond, Oconee County" valued at $500, sold for $700. How cool is that! The second magnolia painting "Lavender Blooms" is now for sale in my shop HERE.

 

LET'S TALK ABOUT SUMMER!

Ahh, summer. I love to travel; I love the sound of the wheels on the pavement, the sound of airplane engines starting. I love to think that my art goes to places like Chicago, New Orleans, New York City, and Paris and represents me there. Where will you go this summer? I’d love to know.

T-SHIRTS ARE HERE!

As you travel, you can wear my Globe t-shirt so everyone can easily recognize which town you love! For those of you who live outside of Athens, I now have a contact at the Globe who will send shirts to you: Write to Norm at globeupstairs@gmail.com. The shirts sell for $15 each. 

NEW EXHIBITS + CLOSING DATES

The OCAF Members exhibit is opening this Friday, June 3, from 6-8 pm. I entered two new paintings, both scenes from the Ashford Manor in Watkinsville, Ga. I am especially happy with this painting of their kitchen:

Also, the closing dates for two of my exhibits have been extended – but hurry! 

  • And my year-long show at the Columbus Museum in Columbus, Ga will close on July 31st.

Thank you for supporting my work! And don’t forget to let me know where you are traveling this summer, so I can travel along with you.

 

Cheers,

-René

 

 

 

 

Blue is a Color of Relaxation

Blue is the color of the sky, the sea, and vintage Volvos. It is the color of wisdom, confidence and intelligence. Blue looks good on almost everyone, and brings a smile to people's faces. It is calming. Blue is also the color of the new Globe Athens t-shirts...designed by me!

Purchase a print  HERE

Purchase a print HERE

 

They are beautiful and fun, they support a local institution, and they let everyone who sees you know how much you love Athens! Only $15 at available only at The Globe, 199 N Lumpkin Street, downtown Athens, GA. (706) 353-4721

Come visit! I am so proud!

 

Successful Silk Painting Workshop at the Columbus Museum! 

The silk painting class held on April 30th at the Columbus Museum in Columbus, Georgia was a total success! 

We had a great group of participants, from a young lady who was celebrating her 14th birthday with us to a six-month-old baby accompanied by his Mom. It was a talented group of people who really enjoyed mixing and playing with colors, painting with dye, and experiencing the unique artistic qualities of silk. The results were outstanding!

Thanks to everyone who was there for sharing your time with me. I hope we can do it again soon!

As a matter of fact - in Athens, we can do it again soon.

 

The KA Artist Shop just scheduled my new silk painting class for Saturday afternoon, July 9th, from 1-5 p.m. The price is $85 which includes all supplies. We are adding another hour of class time (from three hours to four) to allow participants enough time to really enjoy the experience without feeling rushed, and we will provide snacks for encouragement and sustenance. 

What would you like to create on silk?

 

CURRENTLY ON VIEW

Café Grumpy Grand Central Terminal

Lexington Passage, New York City through May 31, 2016 

Discovering the Chattahoochee Valley: Silk paintings by René Shoemaker

The Columbus Museum, Columbus, Ga through July 2016

Spring Showcase

KA Artist Gallery, Athens, Ga through June 2, 2016

MEET YOU AT GRAND CENTRAL!

Does the whole world pass through Grand Central Station? What a hub of activity and civilization! What an opportunity for more people to see my artwork! I am pleased to report that my Café Experience prints are now on display at Café Grumpy in Grand Central Station through May 31st. Here is a what it looks like if you walk into the Station:

Send your friends & family there to enjoy a great cup of coffee (in ceramic cups!) on their visit to NYC or on their daily commute. That way they can enjoy a coffee break and discover my artwork, too. (Gosh - I'm still waiting to be discovered by Anthropologie or West Elm - maybe this will do the trick!)

* * *

On top of all that the silk painting class held recently at KA Artist in Athens was a great success. We had a room full of creative participants, and the whole event was lots of fun. Here are some of the paintings-in-progress from that day:

 

Currently on display:
Café Grumpy Grand Central Terminal
Lexington Passage, New York City through May 31, 2016
 
Spring Showcase
KA Artist Gallery, Athens, Ga through June 2, 2016

Discovering the Chattahoochee Valley: 
Silk paintings by René Shoemaker
 The Columbus Museum, Columbus, Ga through July 2016

The One Thing You Need to Know

The One Thing You Need to Know to Get Started in Silk Painting

Painting on silk is a joy.

It is not difficult.

It is quick.

And it is rewarding.

The thing I like best about silk painting is the swiftness of seeing results – the colors, the beauty, and the immediate gratification. You can paint a scarf one day and be wearing it the next! Or hanging it on your wall for all to admire.

Personally, I love to take an image or design and simplify it down to a few lines and shapes. The color then becomes the main focus of the design. Silk soaks up the dye like magic, and it is a beautiful and stunning process to watch.

I'll be teaching a Silk Painting class in Athens in April, and I will send out more details in a few days.

Oh – and that one thing you need to know to get started in silk painting? It doesn’t take any special talent or skill. I will guide you through the process in our class.

Take care,
-René 


René exhibits Café Art in Brooklyn Feb.15 - March 15, 2016

I am so delighted to report I am exhibiting The Café Experience in Park Slope at my favorite Brooklyn coffeeshop - Café Grumpy! Please share this news with your NY friends - I'd love to meet anyone you know. I will be in NY Feb 14-20th. Happy Valentine's Day, y'all!



Color and Pattern on Cloth at Arrowmont

My good friend and great textile artist Susan Gernandt is teaching a workshop this summer at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. If you’ve been thinking about learning about weaving and surface design, it’s your chance to learn from a great one - this is how I met Suzanne - she’ll have you doing great designs and exploring creative ideas in no time! image

I first met Suzanne when I participated in a class she taught titled “Layers of Colors; Layers of Meaning” at the Appalachian Center for Craft. The title of the class intrigued me, yet it is a perfect description of her work.

Added benefit - Suzanne and I are exhibiting together now through the end of February at Aurum Studios in Athens, Ga. The reception is Thursday, February 6, 6-8pm. Come meet her and see our work!

 

Beauty Everyday & Rene's Studio

Beauty Everyday is a beautiful blog highlighting the best design, food and nature of the South. I’ve been watching what these three very talented ladies have been doing for their hometown of Athens, Ga for quite a few years - they seek out the beauty around us and share it freely. I admire their work and am honored to have my living and studio space highlighted by the talented photographer Rinne Allen. To see more:

Accepted into a Juried exhibit!

Two silk paintings of mine have been chosen to be in the OCAF 17th Juried Exhibition this year! You may recognize this design of Port Vendres - I’ve done two versions of this location.

This one is on silk broadcloth which is about the weight of painter’s canvas. The silk broadcloth gets smooth and soft with washing, and the dyes lay down on the silk like some watercolors do on heavy paper - you can see the brush strokes, and the way the dye is taken up by the silk quite nicely. The painterly effect here is much different than what happens when dyeing lighter silks.

The church was a wonderful discovery in a French town, Port Vendres, on the Mediterranean coast near the border with Spain. Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle -”Our Lady of Good News” is a fitting name for a late 19th century church whose town is a fishing and cargo port. I can imagine the women of the village awaiting the return of their loved ones from the sea and being so glad of their safe return that they prayed to  Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle. The church faces the harbor, and I loved the idea of this amazing building inviting people to come in - whether it be by foot, by bike, by auto, or by boat.

Teal City, the second piece that was juried in, is a fanciful place where color rules over order. I see this city bordering, again, on the waterfront, as Manhattan, NY or Sydney, Australia does. The colors are absolutely fantastic together, the material is the same heavy silk broadcloth. While Port Vendres is on the large size, at 29”x 26”, Teal City is smaller and intimate, at 4” x 9”. Both pieces are framed in a beautiful blonde wood frame, and with Teal City, the placement of the silk painting on the mat board within the frame is what inspired me to call it a ‘city’. It floats a little higher than the horizon line, giving me the impression that it is bordering on a body of water. It is an abstract design, totally about the relationship of the colors and shapes, but isn’t it true that all abstract art, when seen, is “read” by the viewer into their own understanding of what it is?

What do you see in “Teal City?”

Come by the OCAF gallery anytime to see the exhibit. The gallery is open 10-4 Tuesday-Saturday. The reception is this Friday night, April 6th, from 6-8 pm! I would love to see you there, and the collection of work displayed by all the artists will be very strong, I am sure. OCAF consistently attracts a great variety of local and national artists.

What a fun evening event it would be to go to with a friend!

Southworks: 17th Annual National Juried Art Exhibition April 6 through May 11, 2012                   Oconee Cutlural Arts Foundation            Reception: April 6, 6-8 pm                        Watkinsville, Ga Free & open to the public                          706.769.4565